Photo 26 Mar 92 notes dfilms:

Toy Story, 1995

Toy Story is going to be twenty years old next year… what?

dfilms:

Toy Story, 1995

Toy Story is going to be twenty years old next year… what?

Photo 30 Jan 8,250 notes fishingboatproceeds:

maureenjohnsonbooks:

THE COVER OF THE JOHN GREEN/HANK GREEN/KATHERINE GREEN/SHERLOCK FANFIC IS HERE. All my career I have longed for a cover like this. 
What’s amazing about it—aside from the obvious—is how well it represents the story.
If you didn’t get this as an HPA perk, what can I say? I’m sorry.

Wow.

Where’s Dave Green?

fishingboatproceeds:

maureenjohnsonbooks:

THE COVER OF THE JOHN GREEN/HANK GREEN/KATHERINE GREEN/SHERLOCK FANFIC IS HERE. All my career I have longed for a cover like this. 

What’s amazing about it—aside from the obvious—is how well it represents the story.

If you didn’t get this as an HPA perk, what can I say? I’m sorry.

Wow.

Where’s Dave Green?

Photo 23 Jan 333 notes theashleyclements:

I enjoy this floral pink wallpaper that also incorporates bats and bones.

Damn you, The Ashley Clements, you made me track this down and order samples in all the colors!
ALL THE COLORS!!!

theashleyclements:

I enjoy this floral pink wallpaper that also incorporates bats and bones.

Damn you, The Ashley Clements, you made me track this down and order samples in all the colors!

ALL THE COLORS!!!

via .
Text 21 Jan 8 notes wtf

bisexuallibrarian:

dingdongyouarewrong:

bisexuallibrarian:

I mean, could you at least have a redhead instead of a blonde for your little Amelia Pond vision? WTF?

That was Caitlin Blackwood, she technically played Amy before Karen Gillan did, since Season 5, and they’re cousins.

That’s an interesting tidbit I did not know. Seeing the more blonde hair bouncing by in the background just really took me out of the story. 

As I recall, there was a flashback which used a previous scene where Caitlin Blackwood played young Amy, but that final scene, the one where you never see her face and she’s skipping around the TARDIS, I think that was a substitute. Mainly because you never get to see her face, and because of the blonde hair.

Also, why go to the trouble of hiring Caitlin Blackwood for that final scene, then never show her? No, they got another actress, either because Blackwood had grown too much or wasn’t available or whatever. I was put off by that too, but there were plenty of other things about that episode I didn’t care for, that was a minor one for me.

Video 13 Jan 56,203 notes

tessellation29:

ink-splotch:

There comes a point where Susan, who was the older girl, is lost to Narnia because she becomes interested in lipstick. She’s become irreligious basically because she found sex. I have a big problem with that.” - JK Rowling

Can we talk about Susan’s fabulous adventures after Narnia? The ones where she wears nylons and elegant blouses when she wants to, and short skirts and bright lipstick when she wants to, and hiking boots and tough jeans and big men’s plaid shirts when she feels like backpacking out into the mountains and remembering what it was to be lost in a world full of terrific beauty— I know her siblings say she stops talking about it, that Susan walks away from the memories of Narnia, but I don’t think she ever really forgot.

I want to read about Susan finishing out boarding school as a grown queen reigning from a teenaged girl’s body. School bullies and peer pressure from children and teachers who treat you like you’re less than sentient wouldn’t have the same impact. C’mon, Susan of the Horn, Susan who bested the DLF at archery, and rode a lion, and won wars, sitting in a school uniform with her eyebrows rising higher and higher as some old goon at the front of the room slams his fist on the lectern. 

Susan living through WW2, huddling with her siblings, a young adult (again), a fighting queen and champion marksman kept from the action, until she finally storms out against screaming parents’ wishes and volunteers as a nurse on the front. She keeps a knife or two hidden under her clothes because when it comes down to it, they called her Gentle, but sometimes loving means fighting for what you care for. 

She’ll apply to a women’s college on the East Coast, because she fell in love with America when her parents took her there before the war. She goes in majoring in Literature (her ability to decipher High Diction in historical texts is uncanny), but checks out every book she can on history, philosophy, political science. She sneaks into the boys’ school across town and borrows their books too. She was once responsible for a kingdom, roads and taxes and widows and crops and war. She grew from child to woman with that mantle of duty wrapped around her shoulders. Now, tossed here on this mundane land, forever forbidden from her true kingdom, Susan finds that she can give up Narnia but she cannot give up that responsibility. She looks around and thinks I could do this better.

I want Susan sneaking out to drink at pubs with the girls, her friends giggling at the boys checking them out from across the way, until Susan walks over (with her nylons, with her lipstick, with her sovereignty written out in whatever language she damn well pleases) and beats them all at pool. Susan studying for tests and bemoaning Aristotle and trading a boy with freckles all over his nose shooting lessons so that he will teach her calculus. Susan kissing boys and writing home to Lucy and kissing girls and helping smuggle birth control to the ladies in her dorm because Susan Pevensie is a queen and she understands the right of a woman to rule over her own body. 

Susan losing them all to a train crash, Edmund and Peter and Lucy, Jill and Eustace, and Lucy and Lucy and Lucy, who Susan’s always felt the most responsible for. Because this is a girl who breathes responsibility, the little mother to her three siblings until a wardrobe whisked them away and she became High Queen to a whole land, ruled it for more than a decade, then came back centuries later as a legend. What it must do to you, to be a legend in the body of a young girl, to have that weight on your shoulders and have a lion tell you that you have to let it go. What is must do to you, to be left alone to decide whether to bury your family in separate ceremonies, or all at once, the same way they died, all at once and without you. What it must do to you, to stand there in black, with your nylons, and your lipstick, and feel responsible for these people who you will never be able to explain yourself to and who you can never save. 

Maybe she dreams sometimes they made it back to Narnia after all. Peter is a king again. Lucy walks with Aslan and all the dryads dance. Maybe Susan dreams that she went with them— the train jerks, a bright light, a roar calling you home. 

Maybe she doesn’t. 

Susan grows older and grows up. Sometimes she hears Lucy’s horrified voice in her head, “Nylons? Lipstick, Susan? Who wants to grow up?”  and Susan thinks, “Well you never did, Luce.” Susan finishes her degree, stays in America (England looks too much like Narnia, too much like her siblings, and too little, all at once). She starts writing for the local paper under the pseudonym Frank Tumnus, because she wants to write about politics and social policy and be listened to, because the name would have made Edmund laugh. 

She writes as Susan Pevensie, too, about nylons and lipstick, how to give a winning smiles and throw parties, because she knows there is a kind of power there and she respects it. She won wars with war sometimes, in Narnia, but sometimes she stopped them before they began.

Peter had always looked disapprovingly on the care with which Susan applied her makeup back home in England, called it vanity. And even then, Susan would smile at him, say “I use what weapons I have at hand,” and not explain any more than that. The boy ruled at her side for more than a decade. He should know better. 

Vain is not the proper word. This is about power. But maybe Peter wouldn’t have liked the word “ambition” any more than “vanity.”

Susan is a young woman in the 50s and 60s. Frank Tumnus has quite the following now. He’s written a few books, controversial, incendiary. Susan gets wrapped up in the civil rights movement, because of course she would. It’s not her first war. All the same, she almost misses the White Witch. Greed is a cleaner villain than senseless hate. She gets on the Freedom Rider bus, mails Mr. Tumnus articles back home whenever there’s a chance, those rare occasions they’re not locked up or immediately threatened. She is older now than she ever was in Narnia. Susan dreams about Telemarines killing fauns. 

Time rolls on. Maybe she falls in love with a young activist or an old cynic. Maybe she doesn’t. Maybe Frank Tumnus, controversial in the moment, brilliant in retrospect, gets offered an honorary title from a prestigious university. She declines and publishes an editorial revealing her identity. Her paper fires her. Three others mail her job offers. 

When Vietnam rolls around, she protests in the streets. Susan understands the costs of war. She has lived through not just through the brutal wars of one life, but two. 

Maybe she has children now. Maybe she tells them stories about a magical place and a magical lion, the stories Lucy and Edmund brought home about how if you sail long enough you reach the place where the seas fall off the edge of the world. But maybe she tells them about Cinderella instead, Sleeping Beauty, Rapunzel, except Rapunzel cuts off her own hair and uses it to climb down the tower and escape. The damsel uses what tools she has at hand. 

A lion told her to walk away, and she did. He forbade her magic, he forbade her her own kingdom, so she made her own. 

Susan Pevensie did not lose faith. She found it. 

image

This is what became of Susan, let no one tell you different.

(Source: ifallelseperished)

Photo 11 Jan 3,129 notes zohbugg:

thefrogman:

zohbugg:

Just a quick picture to support The Frogman. He’s hit a bit of a rough patch, but Ben is one of the most amazing and strong people I’ve ever had the pleasure of talking to. You can do it, buddy!
Also his SuperOtis shirt is my favorite thing ever. Get your own here!

Zoë is simultaneously a cutie pie and a sweetie pie. Add that to those killer biceps and her Uruk-Hai Scimitar and she is also a deadly pie. There is a lot of pie going on here.
One day when the world is taken over by zombies, we will join together in battle. Her with the scimitar and me with my bat’leth.

Wait… no, not that one. 

There we go. 

The zombie apocalypse doesn’t stand a chance against our fictional weapon wielding awesomeness. 

Two people, brought together by the internet, and a desire to kick some zombie ass… Coming this summer, it’s “Bat’leth and The Scimitar”. 
I mean c’mon, I’d watch that movie. 

Where’s the poster for this movie, Tumblr?

zohbugg:

thefrogman:

zohbugg:

Just a quick picture to support The Frogman. He’s hit a bit of a rough patch, but Ben is one of the most amazing and strong people I’ve ever had the pleasure of talking to. You can do it, buddy!

Also his SuperOtis shirt is my favorite thing ever. Get your own here!

Zoë is simultaneously a cutie pie and a sweetie pie. Add that to those killer biceps and her Uruk-Hai Scimitar and she is also a deadly pie. There is a lot of pie going on here.

One day when the world is taken over by zombies, we will join together in battle. Her with the scimitar and me with my bat’leth.

image

Wait… no, not that one. 

image

There we go. 

The zombie apocalypse doesn’t stand a chance against our fictional weapon wielding awesomeness. 

Two people, brought together by the internet, and a desire to kick some zombie ass… Coming this summer, it’s “Bat’leth and The Scimitar”.

I mean c’mon, I’d watch that movie. 

Where’s the poster for this movie, Tumblr?

Link 30 Dec 65,142 notes http://kierkegaardandkantandcocoa.tumblr.com/post/71667575342/probabilityjunction»

probabilityjunction:

kierkegaardandkantandcocoa:

assbuttyourargumentisinvalid:

ohtentoo:

If you’re worried about Moffat fucking up the Twelfth Doctor, just remember:

image

he has already argued with Moffat over the scripts, which shows promise

does anyone have any

I can’t find any thing to support it, links from the post above take me to a secondhand account of something Matt Smith said and an inference about arguing made from it. But then, I’m on my phone at work so my resources aren’t that great. I’ll take another stab at sourcing later and reply if I find something more direct, but I doubt it’s absolutely true in any case. More of a too good to be true scenario I think.

Text 30 Dec 65,142 notes

kierkegaardandkantandcocoa:

assbuttyourargumentisinvalid:

ohtentoo:

If you’re worried about Moffat fucking up the Twelfth Doctor, just remember:

image

he has already argued with Moffat over the scripts, which shows promise

does anyone have any source or evidence for Capaldi arguing with Moffat over the scripts? I’ve seen it going around but never with any source so I am deeply deeply suspicious, esp. knowing tumblr’s tendency to believe whatever shite gets reblogged.

This is the first I’ve heard of it, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it were true. Capaldi is older and has more of a career going as he comes into this, so I could see him arguing against crap he didn’t like. Matt Smith did not have those advantages when he was cast, so it’s doubtful it would have occurred to him to argue with Moffat.

I hope it’s true, tired of Moffat’s BS and smugness about it. I liked him much more when he wrote occasional episodes and we didn’t have to hear him in interviews, I had higher hopes then.

Photo 7 Nov 541 notes I don’t know why, but this just made me laugh so hard… his face…

I don’t know why, but this just made me laugh so hard… his face…

(Source: canniballauritz)

Quote 17 Oct 17,314 notes
If you read one book a week, starting at the age of 5, and live to be 80, you will have read a grand total of 3,900 books, a little over one-tenth of 1 percent of the books currently in print.
— 

The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop, Lewis Buzbee (via bibliotheque)

This depresses me.

(Source: prettybooks)


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